Energy Saving -- How to Save Money and Energy with Double Glazing

Double Glazing Concepts

Double Glazing Concepts

Creating an energy-efficient home is about more than simply using less energy to heat, cool, and power it– it’s also about better using the energy that’s there. Even something as simple as a little draught can contribute to massive heat loss over the autumn and winter months, and a loss of heat means a loss for you and the environment. These measures can be as simple as the type of glass you have in your windows, for example, energy saving windows are usually made from planitherm glass to keep in more heat, meaning you save money and energy. This simple change can make a huge difference. To see how much of a change it can make, we looked into costs of running a home.

Heating bills alone have soared by over 63% in the past decade, and families polled in 2013 revealed that the biggest chunk of most family budgets is devoted to heating and taking care of their homes. If this seems like a big deal for consumers, imagine the environmental impact– wasting heat wastes both money and fuel, contributing to unnecessary pollution and climate change.
Fortunately, these increases in spending don’t have to be an inevitability. Families may not be able to control the rising costs of fuel or electricity, but they can control how their homes use it. By making sure that homes are properly insulated to keep heated or cooled air from escaping, they can reduce their fuel usage and monthly bills.

The cost cutting aspects of insulating your home

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Property insulating a home doesn’t always mean opening up the walls and replacing insulation, either. Replacing old windows with energy-efficient double glazing can make a huge difference; the typical gas-heated flat can save up to £65 per year, while a detached home can save up to £175.
There are a few things to look for when buying double glazed windows, however. Avoid windows that have metal spacers between panes– metal is an excellent thermal conductor. Air is also a good thermal conductor, so the best double glazed windows will have an inert gas (typically argon, xenon, or krypton) between the panes. Look for “Low-E” glass. This is glass that has a metal oxide coating on one side, which allows light and heat to pass through while reducing the amount of heat that’s able to escape. Lastly, some window companies label their products with a letter grade similar to that given to appliances. In this case, the entire window including the frame is included in their assessment of its energy efficiency.

Though replacing the windows in a home may seem like a big expense, they can end up paying for themselves over time in energy savings. An occasional draught might seem like a minor thing, but it can make an enormous difference in one’s comfort level and monthly bills.

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